Media Clips

September 14, 2017

California Democratic leaders want their state to commit to a future of 100 percent renewable electricity, a goal approved so far by only one U.S. state—Hawaii. Top officials in both places hope their policies will serve as a model for others as the Trump administration rejects actions on climate change.

California and Hawaii offer very different models for committing their power sectors to clean electricity. They differ on everything from mandate deadlines to what's considered renewable.

September 14, 2017

The leader of California's state Senate on Wednesday sharply criticized a call from Sen. Dianne Feinstein for "patience" with President Trump, suggesting it was tantamount to being "complicit" in his behavior. The comments by Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) offer a glimpse into the vastly different approaches by two leading California Democrats to Trump's first few months in office.

August 24, 2017

A month after a bruising political battle to extend California’s cap-and-trade program, the state received a big vote of confidence in the policy’s future. Cap and trade requires oil refineries, food processors and other facilities to buy permits to release greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere, and state regulators auction off the permits several times a year.

During August’s auction, every emission permit offered by the state was sold, and prices reached their highest level since the program launched five years ago.

August 24, 2017

California could solidify its position as a global leader on the issue of climate change in the coming weeks, when the state Legislature considers a bill that would push for the state to obtain all its electricity from renewable sources by 2045. Hawaii is the only other state in America to have committed to that ambitious goal, but the 50th state is 1/15 the size of California and is home to just 3.5 percent as many people.

August 23, 2017

The California Senate will hold a series of public hearings next month to explore the rise of white supremacy in California and to ensure that the state is prepared to deal with race-driven rallies in the aftermath of the violence in Charlottesville.

“These issues cut to the heart of our society and our response will show what kind of nation we want to be,” said Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León while announcing the hearings on the Senate Floor on Monday. “We don’t want it to repeat itself again in our great state of California.”

August 23, 2017

California lawmakers will hold a series of hearings next month to assess the rise of white supremacy in the state and to determine if there are any laws needed to help control violent outbreaks at public rallies. State Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, called for the hearings Monday as lawmakers returned to the state Capitol after a monthlong recess.

August 23, 2017

California state senators began their return to legislative work on a somber note Monday, with a remembrance of the victims of violence in Charlottesville, Va., and Barcelona Spain, and an appeal by Senate leader Kevin de Léon (D-Los Angeles) to reject the white nationalist ideology on display in Virginia. De Léon began the floor session with a warning of a "rising tide of hate and intolerance threatening to once again tear us apart."

August 23, 2017

Now that lawmakers have extended the cap-and-trade program, it’s time for them to divvy up the money generated by the sale of pollution permits. Most of the revenue is already being routed to affordable housing, mass transit and building the bullet train. But there’s still at least $1.4 billion available, which includes some money left over from the last fiscal year and more cash expected to roll in over the next one.

August 23, 2017

Californians could vote on billions of dollars in new spending for low-income housing developments and water and parks improvements next year. Gov. Jerry Brown and lawmakers are considering five proposals that would finance new homes for low-income residents, build parks in neighborhoods without them and restore rivers, streams and creeks among dozens of other projects. The Legislature is likely to decide how much money would be borrowed and where it would be spent before it adjourns for the year in mid-September — a debate that legislative leaders say is pressing.

August 23, 2017

Another day, another lawsuit over the federal government’s immigration policy. This morning the state’s top prosecutor, Xavier Becerra, and San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera announced that they are filing side-by-side law suits against the Trump administration, an effort to protect federal funding for designated “sanctuary jurisdictions.”