Media Clips

September 20, 2017

California lawmakers approved a “sanctuary state” bill on Saturday that would put new restrictions on interactions between local law enforcement and federal immigration authorities, drawing the ire of federal officials who argued the legislation prioritizes politics over public safety. The bill, known as SB-54, is intended to bolster the state’s immigrant protections, which are already among the toughest in the nation.

September 20, 2017

California lawmakers on Saturday passed a “sanctuary state” bill to protect immigrants without legal residency in the U.S., part of a broader push by Democrats to counter expanded deportation orders under the Trump administration. The legislation by Sen. Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles), the most far-reaching of its kind in the country, would limit state and local law enforcement communication with federal immigration authorities, and prevent officers from questioning and holding people on immigration violations.

September 20, 2017

In what appeared to be an act of defiance against President Trump and to the dismay of many in law enforcement, California lawmakers took a significant step toward making the state a so-called “sanctuary state.”

September 14, 2017

California is about to become a so-called sanctuary state. What does that mean? It means California will refuse to help federal agents deport people who came here illegally but are staying out of trouble and contributing positively to the state. But it means ratting out the bad guys to the feds — the convicted robbers, killers, drug traders and other assorted criminals.

“If you’re a violent felon, we don’t want you in this country,” says state Senate leader Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles). “Whether you’re from Ireland or Korea, it doesn’t make any difference.”

September 14, 2017

From street protests to court suits, California is leading the resistance to the Trump administration’s harsh treatment of undocumented immigrants. But this fight carries the risk of going too far in shunning federal law in the name of protecting those fearful of deportation.

September 14, 2017

The best and toughest political compromises are those in which each side makes meaningful, significant concessions. The deal on the “sanctuary state” bill struck this week by Senate leader Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, and Gov. Jerry Brown is one such compromise. The measure would limit — but not ban — help provided by state and local law enforcement agencies to federal immigration authorities.

September 14, 2017

For months, lawmakers in Sacramento have debated what it would mean for California to become a “sanctuary state,” with strict regulations over how much law enforcement agencies could do to help federal immigration authorities. On Monday, Gov. Jerry Brown and Kevin de León, the Democratic leader of the state Senate who introduced the legislation, reached an agreement that seemed to appease both supporters and critics.

September 14, 2017

Gov. Jerry Brown and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León struck a deal on California’s “sanctuary state” bill Monday after weeks of negotiations. The bill was amended to expand law enforcement’s ability to cooperate with federal immigration authorities, reflecting a compromise between the two political leaders. Brown previously said he was seeking changes to the measure, casting doubts on whether he would sign an earlier and stronger version of the bill.

September 14, 2017

Like the America of our ideals, California welcomes newcomers who arrive seeking to build new lives. Yes, the history of our state’s quest for equality, like that of our nation, is marred by mistakes and aberrations. But as President Donald Trump plays his harsh brand of politics with the children of immigrants who came here illegally, California lawmakers must take a stand by approving Senate Bill 54, legislation that would create what has come to be known as a sanctuary state.

September 14, 2017

After Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced on Tuesday that the Trump administration was ending DACA — the Obama-era program that protects nearly 800,000 young immigrants from deportation — California's response came from a trio of top Democratic leaders who are the sons of immigrants.