Press Release

Bill Now Goes to Governor for His Expected Signature

Saturday, September 16, 2017

SACRAMENTO – The California Senate today gave final approval to Senate Bill 54, the California Values Act, sending this closely-watched measure by Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) to Governor Brown for his signature. Once signed into law and enacted, SB 54 will prevent state and local law enforcement officers and resources from being commandeered by President Trump to enforce federal immigration laws.

 

Press Release

Package Increases Accountability, Affordability, and Accessibility of Housing in California

Friday, September 15, 2017

SACRAMENTO – The California legislature today passed fifteen a package of fifteen consequential measures aimed at tackling the state’s housing crisis; a problem that has made California home to 21 of the 30 most expensive housing markets in the nation.

At a time when homeownership in California is at its lowest point since the 1940’s, the state Senate is moving policies to fund new development, streamline approval processes, strengthen existing laws, and create more local accountability to build new housing and increase homeownership across the Golden State. 

Video
Friday, September 15, 2017
Media Advisory
Friday, September 15, 2017

SACRAMENTOCalifornia State Senators will hold a press conference immediately following a vote on landmark housing legislation.

http://focus.senate.ca.gov/housing 

*Livestream*

When: 4:00, Friday, September 15, 2017

Where: Outside Senate Chambers

Press Release

Historic Investment of Cap-and-Trade Dollars to Reduce Pollution

Friday, September 15, 2017

SACRAMENTO – The Senate today passed budget trailer bills AB 109 and AB 134, making this the most historic investment of its kind to clean air across California and advance zero-emission technologies in the transportation sector. Senate Democrats this summer led in determining the spending priorities for the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund, with the primary focus on reducing carbon emissions and other air pollutants from the transportation sector.

 

Media Clips
Thursday, September 14, 2017

California is about to become a so-called sanctuary state. What does that mean? It means California will refuse to help federal agents deport people who came here illegally but are staying out of trouble and contributing positively to the state. But it means ratting out the bad guys to the feds — the convicted robbers, killers, drug traders and other assorted criminals.

“If you’re a violent felon, we don’t want you in this country,” says state Senate leader Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles). “Whether you’re from Ireland or Korea, it doesn’t make any difference.”

Media Clips
Thursday, September 14, 2017

From street protests to court suits, California is leading the resistance to the Trump administration’s harsh treatment of undocumented immigrants. But this fight carries the risk of going too far in shunning federal law in the name of protecting those fearful of deportation.

Media Clips
Thursday, September 14, 2017

The best and toughest political compromises are those in which each side makes meaningful, significant concessions. The deal on the “sanctuary state” bill struck this week by Senate leader Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, and Gov. Jerry Brown is one such compromise. The measure would limit — but not ban — help provided by state and local law enforcement agencies to federal immigration authorities.

Media Clips
Thursday, September 14, 2017

For months, lawmakers in Sacramento have debated what it would mean for California to become a “sanctuary state,” with strict regulations over how much law enforcement agencies could do to help federal immigration authorities. On Monday, Gov. Jerry Brown and Kevin de León, the Democratic leader of the state Senate who introduced the legislation, reached an agreement that seemed to appease both supporters and critics.

Media Clips
Thursday, September 14, 2017

Gov. Jerry Brown and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León struck a deal on California’s “sanctuary state” bill Monday after weeks of negotiations. The bill was amended to expand law enforcement’s ability to cooperate with federal immigration authorities, reflecting a compromise between the two political leaders. Brown previously said he was seeking changes to the measure, casting doubts on whether he would sign an earlier and stronger version of the bill.